Little Sweet Potato

little sweet potatoHas your child ever felt left out? Like they don’t belong?I think this is a book that both children and adults can appreciate.

When I saw this book on amazon a couple of weeks ago, it sparked my interest. Of course, first because of the title since I love sweet potatoes but more importantly, the message of the book caught my attention. I love how the author explains a complex situation in such a simple manner that young children can understand.

Little Sweet Potato (appropriate for ages preschool to 2nd grade) begins with little sweet potato losing his way in the garden. When he gets lost, he tries to find his home with the carrots, eggplant and even flowers. The carrots are mean to little sweet potato by telling him that he is “lumpy and dumpy”. They tell him he doesn’t belong. Sweet potato moves on to the eggplant where they tell him that they “are handsome and have skin like satin”. They tell him him that he “dumpy,  bumpy, and kinda lumpy” and then tell him to  “scram” . This continues through the book until sweet potato finally meets a friend and brings him to a place where everyone accepts him for who he is and not what he looks like.

This book teaches accepting others as individuals and not judging others. This book is all around an excellent book to have in your library.

Encourage conversation with this book by asking your child how Little Sweet Potato feels when he is not accepted. Ask your child if they ever felt that way. Discuss the importance of respecting each other and being kind. Encourage problem solving by asking your child what they would do if they were sweet potato.

Great carryover books: Have you Filled A Bucket Today?, One

Trackbacks

  1. […] Little Sweet Potato begins with a sweet potato losing his way in the garden. When he gets lost, he tries to find his home with the carrots, eggplant and even flowers. The carrots are mean to little sweet potato by telling him that he is “lumpy and dumpy”. They tell him he doesn’t belong. Sweet potato moves on to the eggplant where they tell him that they “are handsome and have skin like satin”. They tell him that he “dumpy,  bumpy, and kinda lumpy” and then tell him to  “scram” . This continues through the book until sweet potato finally meets a friend and brings him to a place where everyone accepts him for whom he is and not what he looks like. For the full review, click here. […]

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